April is National End Distracted Driving Month. Results from a recent research study have been released illuminating drivers’ characteristics and their likelihood of using a cell phone while driving.

First, is the age of the driver.
People 25 and under are four times more likely to use a cell phone while driving than older drivers. There was not a significant difference in cell phone usage while driving between young drivers and middle age drivers.

Second, is the sex of the driver.
Female drivers had a higher odds of cell phone usage and texting while driving than their male counterparts.

Third, is was there a passenger.
Drivers driving without a passenger are four times more likely to be talking on their cell phone than those driving with a passenger.

The study was conducted in six Texas cities from on a single October weekday from 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. in 2011, 2012, and 2013. 1,280 observations were made. While the study documented that the prevalence of cell phone usage while driving has declined, 20.5% to 16.4%, it also documented that texting while driving has increased, 6.4% to 8.4%.

The National Safety Council has released an important and powerful video about distracted driving called Calls Kill.  Most people are under the mistaken impression that hands-free cell phone usage while driving is safer. Hands-free is not risk-free, the cognitive distraction, the most dangerous type of distraction, is exactly the same.

Every day, we at Terrell Hogan, represent victims of personal injury and wrongful death as they seek justice, and lawsuits we have pursued have prompted safety changes.  However, that came after the incidents, accidents and injuries happened. We believe it is important to try to help prevent injuries and wrongful deaths. One way is to publish information about the dangers of distracted driving.  One text or call can wreck it all.